TAITMAIL     The Fed and the parlours of power

TAITMAIL The Fed and the parlours of power

The Creative Industries Federation is in a spin, how vertiginous a spin remains to be seen.

On the other musical hand

On the other musical hand

All standard musical instruments require ten active fingers to be able to play them and up to 30,000 children in UK schools are deprived access to music-making as a result. But OHMI is opening up musical expression to them, Simon Tait reports

First woman MP’s portrait presented to Commons

First woman MP’s portrait presented to Commons

This portrait of Constance Countess Markievicz, the first woman to be elected to the House of Commons in 1918, was last night presented to the House on behalf of the Irish parliament.

V&A fulfills £100k regional pledge

V&A fulfills £100k regional pledge

The Victoria & Albert Museum is fulfilling the promise its then director made when it won the 2016 Art Fund Museum of the Year award, to revive its touring design exhibitions.

Pictures at an Exhibition

Pictures at an Exhibition

The Great Exhibition of the North is underway. But will it fulfil the hopes of its creators? Patrick Kelly has a look.

Huge fall in numbers of arts teachers

Huge fall in numbers of arts teachers

Arts teacher numbers in England are in dramatic decline, according to official figures.

Creative Scotland’s Archer resigns

Creative Scotland’s Archer resigns

Creative Scotland chief executive Janet Archer, is leaving after five years in the role.

Kampfner stands down from Fed

Kampfner stands down from Fed

John Kampfner has stood down as chief executive of the Creative Industries’ Federation, which he founded four years ago with Sir John Sorrell.

Audience agency in Scotland closes

Audience agency in Scotland closes

Axe falls after Creative Scotland grant cut

Site making its Steel City mark

Site making its Steel City mark

Sheffield’s Site Gallery is to reopen with three times the space, and a new mission with a new artistic director, it was announced today.

Ground rules set for Brexit culture deal

Ground rules set for Brexit culture deal

The government’s Brexit white paper has set out a basis to ensure artists’ mobility between the UK and Europe after Brexit.

Battersea Arts Centre heralds reopening with Trump protest

Battersea Arts Centre heralds reopening with Trump protest

Three years since Battersea Arts Centre’s great hall burnt down, it is pre-empting it autumn opening today with a defiant message for Donald Trump https://www.bac.org.uk.

TAITMAIL   What, me worry, when Mr Wright has come along?

TAITMAIL What, me worry, when Mr Wright has come along?

Who is Jeremy Wright, the headlines on Tuesday were asking.  For me, he bears an unnerving likeness to Mad Magazine’sAlfred E Neuman (a kind of 1960s Forrest Gump who only ever said “What, me worry?”), but he was the Attorney General and is now the seventh Secretary State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport since 2010.

Dulwich to get a Colour Palace

Dulwich to get a Colour Palace

Dulwich Picture Gallery in South London is to get a “Colour Palace” for its gardens next summer.

Shakespeare Schools wins Japanese arts prize

Shakespeare Schools wins Japanese arts prize

The Shakespeare Schools Foundation has won £33,000 in the Japan Art Association’s Praemium Imperiale 2018 awards.

Matthew Bourne’s tours to go green

Matthew Bourne’s tours to go green

Matthew Bourne’s New Adventures dance company is to collaborate with environmental sustainability agency Julie’s Bicycle to creative a creative green certificate for touring.

Arts centre plan for Reading Gaol

Arts centre plan for Reading Gaol

Councillors in Reading are backing a plan to turn the town’s famous jail into an arts centre.

New culture secretary appointed

New culture secretary appointed

Kenilworth MP and former Attorney General Jeremy Wright MP is the latest Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport .

PATRICK KELLY'S BACK PAGE

AI's guide to the best to come...

Storefront’s innovative pop-up art in Luton features a new installation and a showing of paintings by one of the town’s most exciting artists, Asiya Clarke. Clarke’s life and work are inspired by Sufism, the mystical aspect of Islam. The installation Die before You Die (illustrated) is part of As You Change, So Do I, a three-year series of public art events funded by Arts Council England’s Luton Investment Programme, which produces up to nine projects each year in which artists are given a platform to make new public works in response to the town’s industrial and cultural history. The programme has been curated by Mark Titchner, Matthew Shaul and Andrew Hunt.

 

Tobacco Factory’s critically acclaimed version of Beckett’s Waiting for Godot is
 on a UK tour after a successful run at the Bristol company’s own theatre. Directed by Mark Rosenblatt and designed by Janet Bird, it features Colin Connor as Estragon and David Fielder as Vladmiir. Waiting for Godot is at the Stephen Joseph Theatre in Scarborough from November 22-25.

 

In the Peaceful Dome concludes Bluecoat’s 300th anniversary year and brings together historic and contemporary art, new commissions and archival material which connect the Liverpool arts centre's’past with the present. Among the artists featured are Roderick Bisson, Fanny Calder, Jacob Epstein, Fab Lab Liverpool, Janet Hodgson, Sumuyya Khader and William C. Penn, whose is pictured. In the Peaceful Dome runs until March 2018.

 

Edinburgh’s City Art Centre is hosting Songs for Winter, 
a joint exhibition exploring 
the work of Pauline Burbidge and Charles Poulsen. The pair settled in the Borders turning a set of farm buildings an hour south east of Edinburgh, Allanbank Mill Steading, into their home and studios. It is an inspiring house, garden and working environment which they open up each year for a four-day event. Songs for Winter shows the diversity and unity of their work and runs until 4 March 2018.

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