First disabled arts champ named

First disabled arts champ named

The arts producer and strategist Andrew Miller has been appointed the first champion for the disabled in arts and culture.

New reports show how Brexit will hit the arts

New reports show how Brexit will hit the arts

English cultural organisations stand to lose £40m a year with Brexit, with 64% oif them currently working inside the European Union. The report from EUCLID, commissioned by Arts Council England, shows that between 2007 and 2016 the EU contributed £345m to England’s arts, museums and creative industries, or £40m a year.

Boost for Banbury Museum expansion

Councillors have agreed plans to double the size of Banbury’s museum in a £5m expansion scheme.

Creative Scotland apology over funding row

Creative Scotland apology over funding row

Archer promises review of funding process

Books by the Ocean

Books by the Ocean

A ‘crazy’ notion to bring a literary festival to Sri Lanka has proved an astounding success. Patrick Kelly reports

Cultural kids' programme reaching out

Cultural kids' programme reaching out

An Arts Council programme devised to help young children from deprived areas through involvement in the arts is working, according to an evaluation report published today.

Call for arts support in Northern Ireland

Call for arts support in Northern Ireland

Arts sector representatives and tourist companies in Northern Ireland have called on politicians to recognise the important role the arts plays in the economy of the region.

Music venues survey shows third ‘under threat’

Music venues survey shows third ‘under threat’

But Scotland embraces ‘Agent of Change’ principle.

Hockney is critics' choice

Hockney is critics' choice

David Hockney is to receive the Critics’ Circle Award for 2017, only the second time a visual artist has been selected for the prestigious prize in the Circle’s 105-year history.

Photojournalism's art gallery

Photojournalism's art gallery

A new website at last gives Fleet Street’s photographers a showcase for their work as art. Simon Tait spoke to its founders, Fleet Street veterans Alan Sparrow and Bret Painter-Spanyol

Museums' collecting frozen by funding cuts

Museums' collecting frozen by funding cuts

Britain’s museums are being increasingly excluded from the art market by cuts in funding, stifling the acquisitions that are the life force for public collections.

Creative industries on track to create 1m local jobs - Nesta

The creative industries are driving the UK’s economic growth, expanding twice as fast as any other sector, according to new research by Nesta.

BAFTA/BFI set harassment zero-tolerance rules

BAFTA/BFI set harassment zero-tolerance rules

Film and television organisations led by BAFT and the BFI have set a series of principles and guidelines to deal with bullying and sexual harassment in the industry.

Tax deal takes early Freuds back to Lakes

Tax deal takes early Freuds back to Lakes

Two really portraits by Lucian Freud have been left to the nation in lieu of tax and allocated to the Abbott Hall Gallery in Kendal.

Mary Beard to front Front Row

Mary Beard to front Front Row

The classics professor Mary Beard is to anchor the revamped television version of the arts review magazine Front Row when it returns in the spring.

17c mystery painting still baffling experts

17c mystery painting still baffling experts

This large picture of 1665 by an anonymous artist is one of the great mysteries of the art world, and is the centerpiece of a forthcoming major Norwich Castle Museum exhibition.

London goes Underground

London goes Underground

Photographs of some faces and places associated with the capital go on display at five London Tube stations this week.

British Art Fair goes to the Saatchi

British Art Fair goes to the Saatchi

Celebrating its 30th birthday this year, the 20/21 British Art Fair has changed ownership and will move to the Saatchi Gallery.

The Word: The dying art of photo editing

 Ion Paciu, founder of the Photoion Photography School, explores the pros and cons of instant photo editing, and how editing has changed over the years

 

Traditional photo editing is something that every photographer needs in their toolkit to use at the final stages of capturing an image. Editing is a tool that should not be heavily relied on by a skilled photographer, it’s something that should be used during the image workflow which is the process of “finishing” your images after uploading your raw files to your computer; making minor tweaks to improve the information captured by the camera. But depending on the industry and type of photography some images only need one minute of editing while others need hours.

Over recent years, the media and the general public have relied heavily on photo editing programmes to achieve the perfect image, and this has also evolved with technology. I think the development of smartphones and photo editing apps is fantastic, as they allow everyone to capture images on the go and, to an extent, edit pictures; however there is no substitute for quality - detailed photo editing and apps will never replace this.

Recent research revealed approximately 68% of adults will not share their images without editing them first, either being a raw or a jpg image. The rest share their images as they come off the camera.

Our survey quizzed Brits on the motives behind the editing of images, and found that the majority (96%) of those who do use editing tools or apps do so before uploading images to social media sites including Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest.

The rise in these apps and social media sites is creating a false sense of perfection when it comes to images and a social trend for many. It also shifts the skills of photography from capturing an image to the workflow stages. So is it true that the more we can minimise the editing aspect of photography the more we can capture our photographs for authenticity and honesty?

When working with professional photo editing software you can enhance and finish your images without reducing the quality of them for printing and displaying. In comparison, images edited in apps such as Instagram and Facebook reduce image size and quality which restricts your use to sharing them online and not for printing as the final image result suffers in terms of quality. For example, the colour replacement tool in Photoshop allows you to change the colour while maintaining the highlights and shadows of the original image. Applying a pre-set filter from an app affects the whole range of elements of an image.

As social media is focused on what’s happening now everything becomes instant and images are rushed, people tend not to take the time to edit images properly before they are shared publicly because everyone wants to live-post what’s happening. These images are capturing memories, but after 24 hours are lost on a person’s news feed.

At Photoion we host workshops and sessions with students and tend to highlight the importance that the art of photography is in capturing an image and not just in the workflow stages. I host Photoshop workshops and one to one sessions every month to assist all skill levels on post-production photography. The workshops help students make educated and effective choices about their own images in order to prepare them to be displayed or printed. Many of my students are surprised how little editing is needed on some of their images which have been properly composed at the outset. 

I am very passionate about my work and feel that social media is a huge part of our everyday lives when it comes to sharing images. Social media will continue to develop the way in which we share images, but the downside is that people will not print and store their own images anymore, and quality will be lost due to the rise of these instant editing apps.

 

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