London’s culture zones named

London’s culture zones named

London mayor Sadiq Khan has announced the capital’s first Creative Enterprise Zones, funded to support artists, small creative enterprises and local people.

 Africa Centre’s £1.6m boost

Africa Centre’s £1.6m boost

The Africa Centre’s transplant from Covent Garden to Southwark has received a major boost with a £1.6m grant from the Mayor of London’s Good Growth Fund, while the Black Cultural Archive has been saved from possible closure by a government grant of £200,000.

TAITMAIL     Singing to the stars

TAITMAIL Singing to the stars

It was like a Sunday afternoon at a Southern Gospel Chapel. Massed choirs on the stage jigging around and waving their arms about, the audience responding by standing and clapping their hands above their heads as they hooted their approval, impassioned young conductors urging both choir and audience on to still more frenzy. 

TALK OF THE TOWN HALL   But they persisted….

TALK OF THE TOWN HALL But they persisted….

Patrick Kelly on the arts champions on local authorities who have made cultural revolutions happen

Julie Finch to run Compton Verney

Julie Finch to run Compton Verney

The new director of Compton Verney Art Gallery in Warwickshire is to be Julie Finch, currently the Cheltenham Trust’s CEO.

Thanet council plans museum handover

Thanet council plans museum handover

Campaigners are calling on Thanet District Council to halt its plans to sell Margate Museum, with more than 100 people have signed a petition to keep the heritage building, once a police station, in public hands.

DEA BIRKETT   Paris – where the show never closed

DEA BIRKETT Paris – where the show never closed

In the first of a series marking the 250th anniversary of the circus, Dea Birkett– the official Ringmaster of Circus250 – goes to Paris where circus is defying the gilets jaunes

Outdated systems blocking creativity growth - CIF

Outdated systems blocking creativity growth - CIF

Growth in the creative industries is being stymied by government and policy bodies working by out-dated definitions, according to a report published today by the Cultural Industries Federation (CIF).

Pitzhanger to re-open after £12m restoration

Pitzhanger to re-open after £12m restoration

Pitzhanger Manor, the dream country home created for himself and his family by Sir John Soane, in his time England’s most celebrated architect, is to reopen in March after major restoration.  

‘Purity’ of boys’ voices – it’s Garrett v Bach Choir

‘Purity’ of boys’ voices – it’s Garrett v Bach Choir

Opera soprano Lesley Garrett’s call for an end to male-only choirs has been rebuffed by the head of one of the leading ensembles in the world, the Bach Choir.

New CEO for FACT

New CEO for FACT

FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology) chooses Arts Catalyst's Nicola Triscott and new CEO

DEA BIRKETT Fifteen years ago, a museum visit changed my life

DEA BIRKETT Fifteen years ago, a museum visit changed my life

Last week we reported on the reopening of the V&A’s Cast Courts. Here, Dea Birkett recounts her own especial memory of them

Friends buy Burnley Empire for £1

Friends buy Burnley Empire for £1

The Victorian Burnley Empire has been saved by a friends group, days before it was due to go for auction.

Fitzwilliam’s gift of the Great Belzoni

Fitzwilliam’s gift of the Great Belzoni

The larger than life archaeologist, explorer and circus strong man known as the Great Belzoni is to adorn Cambridge’s Fitzwilliam Museum.

The smartphone Turner Prize

The smartphone Turner Prize

Charlotte Prodger has won this year’s Turner Prize for visual art with a 32-minute film shot on her smartphone.

Rogers to leave Birmingham REP

Rogers to leave Birmingham REP

Executive director steps down after 17 years

To all Dome-loving humans…

To all Dome-loving humans…

David Shrigley has created this limited edition print with proceeds from sales going towards the Build Brighton Dome community appeal.

How WWI enriched contemporary art

How WWI enriched contemporary art

More than 35m people, half the population, have engaged with the 14-18 NOW commemorations of the First World War, which has now ended after five years.

Ally Pally theatre reopens after 80 years

Ally Pally theatre reopens after 80 years

Alexandra Palace’s theatre and East Court reopened at the weekend after a £27m, three-year restoration project.

What's up in… Bristol

What's up in… Bristol

AI looks at what's coming up around the country – this week, the arts in Bristol. 

Bid to save Turner’s Thames view

Bid to save Turner’s Thames view

The government has mounted a campaign to save J M W Turner’s painting Walton Bridgesfor the nation by placing an export stop on it.

Victorian art world – recast by the V&A

Victorian art world – recast by the V&A

The Cast Courts at the V&A, two of the museum’s original 1850s galleries, have reopened after a seven year programme, restored and refurbished as they were 160 years ago.

Brexit: May's deal and the arts

Brexit: May's deal and the arts

The Prime Minister’s withdrawal agreement still leaves the arts and cultural industries in doubt about the future.

Rhian Harris takes over in Lakes

Rhian Harris takes over in Lakes

Rhian Harris, director of the V&A Museum of Childhood since 2008, is to be the new chief executive of Lakeland Arts.

The Word: The dying art of photo editing

 Ion Paciu, founder of the Photoion Photography School, explores the pros and cons of instant photo editing, and how editing has changed over the years

 

Traditional photo editing is something that every photographer needs in their toolkit to use at the final stages of capturing an image. Editing is a tool that should not be heavily relied on by a skilled photographer, it’s something that should be used during the image workflow which is the process of “finishing” your images after uploading your raw files to your computer; making minor tweaks to improve the information captured by the camera. But depending on the industry and type of photography some images only need one minute of editing while others need hours.

Over recent years, the media and the general public have relied heavily on photo editing programmes to achieve the perfect image, and this has also evolved with technology. I think the development of smartphones and photo editing apps is fantastic, as they allow everyone to capture images on the go and, to an extent, edit pictures; however there is no substitute for quality - detailed photo editing and apps will never replace this.

Recent research revealed approximately 68% of adults will not share their images without editing them first, either being a raw or a jpg image. The rest share their images as they come off the camera.

Our survey quizzed Brits on the motives behind the editing of images, and found that the majority (96%) of those who do use editing tools or apps do so before uploading images to social media sites including Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest.

The rise in these apps and social media sites is creating a false sense of perfection when it comes to images and a social trend for many. It also shifts the skills of photography from capturing an image to the workflow stages. So is it true that the more we can minimise the editing aspect of photography the more we can capture our photographs for authenticity and honesty?

When working with professional photo editing software you can enhance and finish your images without reducing the quality of them for printing and displaying. In comparison, images edited in apps such as Instagram and Facebook reduce image size and quality which restricts your use to sharing them online and not for printing as the final image result suffers in terms of quality. For example, the colour replacement tool in Photoshop allows you to change the colour while maintaining the highlights and shadows of the original image. Applying a pre-set filter from an app affects the whole range of elements of an image.

As social media is focused on what’s happening now everything becomes instant and images are rushed, people tend not to take the time to edit images properly before they are shared publicly because everyone wants to live-post what’s happening. These images are capturing memories, but after 24 hours are lost on a person’s news feed.

At Photoion we host workshops and sessions with students and tend to highlight the importance that the art of photography is in capturing an image and not just in the workflow stages. I host Photoshop workshops and one to one sessions every month to assist all skill levels on post-production photography. The workshops help students make educated and effective choices about their own images in order to prepare them to be displayed or printed. Many of my students are surprised how little editing is needed on some of their images which have been properly composed at the outset. 

I am very passionate about my work and feel that social media is a huge part of our everyday lives when it comes to sharing images. Social media will continue to develop the way in which we share images, but the downside is that people will not print and store their own images anymore, and quality will be lost due to the rise of these instant editing apps.

 

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