McPhee’s unforgettable Orgreave images

McPhee’s unforgettable Orgreave images

Today is the 34thanniversary of the Battle of Orgreave, the confrontation between police and pickets at the Orgreave coking plant in South Yorkshire and a pivotal event in the miners’ strike of 1984-85.

Great art in the classroom

Great art in the classroom

More than 70,000 schoolchildren from 125 schools are to get world class works of art in their classrooms as part of the largest ever sculpture project undertaken in Britain.

TaitMail       Bilbao’s King Gugg

TaitMail Bilbao’s King Gugg

It’s almost 21 years since the Guggenheim Bilbao opened, controversially and changing museum aspiration for ever. It was paid for by the Basque government, looked like nothing anyone had ever seen before, and after it opened every city wanted one.

Summer Flight

Summer Flight

Peckham artist Remi Rough has created a new public art installation to welcome visitors to the transformed Wembley Park this summer www.wembleypark.com.

Producer Winter switches West End for Tunbridge Wells

Producer Winter switches West End for Tunbridge Wells

Carole Winter, the West End and Broadway producer with more than 30 shows to her name, is to be the permanent producer at Tunbridge Wells’s Assembly Hall Theatre.

Opera festival’s moving Hope for Grenfell gala

Opera festival’s moving Hope for Grenfell gala

Gareth Malone led a choir of almost 200 children and local residents and celebrities last night in a moving memorial concert at Investec Opera Holland Park to mark the first anniversary of the Grenfell disaster.

Ed Vaizey and Tom Watson to be Achates judges

The third Achates Philanthropy Prize, awarded for first-time cultural giving in the UYK,is to have former culture minister Ed Vaizey and shadow culture secretary Tom Watson as judges.

Guide for museums to diversify visitors

Arts Council England and the Museums Association have launched a new ‘how-to’ guide to help museums increase visitor diversity

Ireland launches international culture strategy

Ireland launches international culture strategy

Seven year programme promises to double arts spend

Murdoch arts charity launches regional artists scheme

Murdoch arts charity launches regional artists scheme

Freelands Foundation will invest £1.5 million

Belfast backs arts funding campaign

Belfast backs arts funding campaign

Councillors support increase in government cash

Top Scottish arts organisation in shock closure

Top Scottish arts organisation in shock closure

NVA blames loss of funding and strains of ambitious restoration plan

Sadiq’s £1.1b cultural vision for Olympic Park

Sadiq’s £1.1b cultural vision for Olympic Park

The Mayor of London has set out plans for East Bank, the new cultural sector in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in the East End, with the BBC being added to the mix.

Museums dependent on blockbusters

Worldwide figures show Louvre back on top

Lost Donizetti opera gets world premiere

Lost Donizetti opera gets world premiere

On July 18, Opera Rara and the Royal Opera House will present the first ever performance of an opera by the great Italian composer, 179 years after it was written. Simon Tait reports

Eureka! plans second site in Liverpool

Eureka! plans second site in Liverpool

Childrens’ museum also to expand original Halifax venue

ACE backs fundraisers scheme

Arts Council England and the Institute of Fundraising have joined forces to develop more arts fundraisers in the sector.

Ludus dance promotes Briggs

Ludus dance promotes Briggs

Artistic director takes on ceo role

The Word: The dying art of photo editing

 Ion Paciu, founder of the Photoion Photography School, explores the pros and cons of instant photo editing, and how editing has changed over the years

 

Traditional photo editing is something that every photographer needs in their toolkit to use at the final stages of capturing an image. Editing is a tool that should not be heavily relied on by a skilled photographer, it’s something that should be used during the image workflow which is the process of “finishing” your images after uploading your raw files to your computer; making minor tweaks to improve the information captured by the camera. But depending on the industry and type of photography some images only need one minute of editing while others need hours.

Over recent years, the media and the general public have relied heavily on photo editing programmes to achieve the perfect image, and this has also evolved with technology. I think the development of smartphones and photo editing apps is fantastic, as they allow everyone to capture images on the go and, to an extent, edit pictures; however there is no substitute for quality - detailed photo editing and apps will never replace this.

Recent research revealed approximately 68% of adults will not share their images without editing them first, either being a raw or a jpg image. The rest share their images as they come off the camera.

Our survey quizzed Brits on the motives behind the editing of images, and found that the majority (96%) of those who do use editing tools or apps do so before uploading images to social media sites including Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest.

The rise in these apps and social media sites is creating a false sense of perfection when it comes to images and a social trend for many. It also shifts the skills of photography from capturing an image to the workflow stages. So is it true that the more we can minimise the editing aspect of photography the more we can capture our photographs for authenticity and honesty?

When working with professional photo editing software you can enhance and finish your images without reducing the quality of them for printing and displaying. In comparison, images edited in apps such as Instagram and Facebook reduce image size and quality which restricts your use to sharing them online and not for printing as the final image result suffers in terms of quality. For example, the colour replacement tool in Photoshop allows you to change the colour while maintaining the highlights and shadows of the original image. Applying a pre-set filter from an app affects the whole range of elements of an image.

As social media is focused on what’s happening now everything becomes instant and images are rushed, people tend not to take the time to edit images properly before they are shared publicly because everyone wants to live-post what’s happening. These images are capturing memories, but after 24 hours are lost on a person’s news feed.

At Photoion we host workshops and sessions with students and tend to highlight the importance that the art of photography is in capturing an image and not just in the workflow stages. I host Photoshop workshops and one to one sessions every month to assist all skill levels on post-production photography. The workshops help students make educated and effective choices about their own images in order to prepare them to be displayed or printed. Many of my students are surprised how little editing is needed on some of their images which have been properly composed at the outset. 

I am very passionate about my work and feel that social media is a huge part of our everyday lives when it comes to sharing images. Social media will continue to develop the way in which we share images, but the downside is that people will not print and store their own images anymore, and quality will be lost due to the rise of these instant editing apps.

 

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