Forget the gig economy, the future is creative

Young people need to be signposted to creative careers and properly nurtured when they start if they are to design the nation’s future.

The Creative Industries Federation has today published its priorities for the next year, and they centre on careers and the freelance nature of the sector, the UK’s fastest growing worth almost £100bn a year to our economy.

“The sector relies heavily on freelancers who have a diverse range of talent and skills, and there needs to be a new emphasis in domestic policy to support them. The creative freelance economy has a long history and shouldn't be confused with the gig economy which is relatively new,” said Caroline Julian, the Federation’s head of policy. “We need to promote the importance and training and access to finance for freelance workers, at government level where needed, because this is the workforce that has enabled so much of the sector's success.”

The CIF, which now has 1,000 members across the UK, is to launch a Creative Careers Campaign, supported by Deloitte, and develop a toolkits for schools, while bringing creative business and entrepreneurs with young people.

One aim is to ensure the creative industries are explicitly at the heart of the Autumn Budget for the first time. The Treasury has emphasised the importance of technology to future, but  this has to sit alongside creativity, Julian said.

The vital change will be when creativity is established in schools’ curriculums, she said, but a creative career needs to be seen to be more stable with businesses that use freelance creatives accepting a regime of prompt payment. There also needs to be training – or signposting to existing help – in accounting and tax, as well as properly established apprenticeships.  

“The Business Secretary has accepted the importance of the creative industries so that the sector is now in the industrial strategy” she said. “But we have to keep making the case to the government on the importance of creative and technical skills, from playground to pension. 

The CIF will also be working with local and regional authorities and with metro mayors as well as Local Enterprise Partnerships, which are now tasked with fashioning local economies, to ensure the creative industries are nurtured from school level. 

The CIF will also be working with local and regional authorities and with metro mayors as well as Local Enterprise Partnerships, which are now tasked with fashioning local economies, to ensure the creative industries are nurtured from school level.

https://www.creativeindustriesfederation.com/policy-and-research/

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