2018's listing highlights: a cock, a cricket pavilion and a subway

Historic England have highlighted the 23 most notable listed monuments of 2018, including the elaborate underpass at Crystal Palace, the Sutton pub sign with no pub and Robin Hood.

They are among 924 new entries, including 638 war memorials, 19 scheduled monuments, eight parks and gardens and one battlefield - the site of the Battle of Winwick, at Warrington, in 1648.

 “Historic England ensures that England’s most significant places are protected and 2018 has seen some remarkable ones added to the List. “From an old lifeboat house in Essex to a former railway station in Otterington, our fascinating history and heritage is celebrated through listing” said Historic England’s CEO, Duncan Wilson. “We encourage people to understand and enjoy the wonderful range of historic places on their own doorsteps and by listing them we are protecting them for future generations.”

Old Lifeboat House, East Terrace, Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, built in 1884, was designed by CH Cooke and represents the crucial role played by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) in saving lives at sea since the 19th century. Its wide gabled structure and ornamental treatment, made up of fish-scale tiling, decorative moulded brick, and a beautifully incorporated bay window, create a finely detailed and strikingly composed building.Listed Grade II

Group of sculptures of Robin Hood and his Merry Men, Castle Place, Nottingham by the Notingham-biorn sculptor James Woodford RA OBE, was commissioned to commemorate the visit of then Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh for the city’s quincentenary celebrations in 1949. Listed Grade II

Cricket Pavilion, Upper Playing Field, Uppingham School, Rutland, follows a tradition of public schools and universities investing in cricket pavilions, with a deep thatched roof that sweeps low over the eaves.  Among the boys who played here was the future Leicestershire and England bowler, and BBC cricket correspondent, Jonathan Agnew.Listed Grade II

Florence Mine, Egremont, West Cumbriais the best-surviving example of an iron mining pit head in England, dating from the mid-19thcentury and retaining a full suite of buildings complete with nearly all of its machinery and equipment. Florence Mine was last worked in 2007, and its hematite iron ore was used for the pigment Egremont Red, still found in some lipsticks today.Listed Grade II

University of York, Central Hall, Heslington, York, is the centrepiece of one of seven new universities founded in England between 1958 and 1961. Andrew Derbyshire and Maurice Lee of RMJM in 1966 to 1968 Central Hall the building is a concrete structure with a suspended mild steel tubular roof clad in aluminium, with the upper floors, where the auditorium is located, cantilevered out on the lake sides. Listed Grade II. The university’s landscaped Campus West laid out between 1963 and 1980, with its lake with two islands, has been listed Grade II Registered Park and Garden.

30 Coptic Street and 35 Little Russell Street, London, near the British Museum was built in 1888 for the Dairy Supply Company and was where milk churns were manufactured. Its use has long changed, but its original signage in moulded Portland stone is intact.Listed Grade II

Hopkins House 49A Downshire Hill, Hampstead, London, was the family home built by the architects Michael and Patty Hopkins in 1975-76, notable for its energy efficiency, which includes the low thermal demands of the house, sparing use of materials and Venetian blinds. Following the completion of the house the couple formed their own practice in 1976, and Michael Hopkins went on to be knighted in 1995.Listed Grade II*

The Cock Sign, Sutton High Street, stands at an important junction and originated from a pub once owned by the boxing champion Gentleman Jackson (1769-1845) but now demolished. The sign dates from 1907and was originally a grand gas lamp-post and pub sign, later converted to electricity and then to a road sign with multiple finger posts.Listed Grade II

Cattle Trough and Drinking Fountain, Spaniards Road, Hampstead, London, is believed to have been erected in 1916, making it a particularly late example of its type. There were about 500 in London, most of them now lost. Listed Grade II

Pedestrian Subway, Vestibule, Terrace and Stairs beneath Crystal Palace Parade, London Boroughs of Bromley and Southwark  (main picture) is an elaborate, Byzantine-style pedestrian passageway, built in 1865 to connect a new railway station to the entrance to the Crystal Palace and designed by Charles Barry Junior, architect of nearby Dulwich College. The subway was first listed Grade II in 1972. Upgraded to Grade II*

74 Dyer Street – The former Wiltshire and Gloucestershire Standard Offices, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, the local newspaper founded in 1837 and still operating today. Its former headquarters, built in 1904 in the Arts & Crafts style, united the printing and publishing operations for the first time, and though it ceased to be used by the publishers in 2017 retains its painted signage. Listed Grade II

Caynton Manor Gatehouse, Caynton, Newport, Shropshire, dates from the early 17thcentury and was the gateway to a great country house, now long lost. It has been rediscovered, having been in agricultural use since the 18thcentury. It is in poor condition, however, and is now being assessed for inclusion on Historic England’s Heritage at Risk Register.Listed Grade II*

Memorial Bus Shelter, Osmington, West Dorset, on the soiuth side of the A353, dates from the 1940s and was built by Harry and Ethel Parry-Jones in memory of their son, David, aged 20 during the Battle of Normandy after D-Day in 1944. Listed Grade II

Wing Test Hangars, Rolls-Royce Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, were built at the airfield in 1917 and from 1934y used to test aero engines and equipment. The world’s first flight of a commercial jet flew from Hucknall to the Paris Air show in the late 1940s, using Frank Whittle’s jet engine which had been developed on site. It is now occupied by the Hucknall branch of the Rolls Royce Heritage Trust.Listed Grade II

Lych gate to the east of Church of St John the Evangelist, Newcastle on Clun, Shropshire, dating from 1880 and built in the Arts & Crafts tradition bringing together joinery, ironmongery and slate work and is inspired by medieval predecessors andinspired by the 13thlych gate at the Church of St George in Beckenham, Kent, believed to be the oldest in the country. Listed Grade II

Former Otterington Railway Station, Station Road, South Otterington, Northallerton, North Yorkshire,on the East Coast Main Line north of York with its signal box was built by the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) in 1932. It closed in 1964 but has been conserved through devoted private ownership. Listed Grade II

The Assembly Rooms, Charlton, London Borough of Greenwichis a charming community hall built in late-19th century Jacobean Revival style as an example of local philanthropy, Sir Spencer Maryon-Wilson, who lived in the nearby Grade I listed Charlton House.Listed Grade II

Garden at Kingcombe, Chipping Camden, Gloucestershire, complements Grade II listed Kingcombe House and is a rare survival of an Arts & Crafts garden laid out in the 1930s. IT has a terraced garden including Italian steps to divide it from the more functional parts of the garden and to provide a vertical link from the top of the terraces to the meadow beyond the garden. Grade II Registered Park and Garden

East Mellwaters) County Durham, is a walled settlement 200m south-east of East Mellwaters farmhousedating from the Iron Age formed of stone now reduced to stony earthworks. The site is adjacent to other prehistoric settlement remains, which are thought to represent a succession of settlement sites established over the centuries.Scheduled Monument

Cappleside Barn, Rathmell, North Yorkshire, wasbuilt in 1714 with a remarkable ornamental roof structure with carefully shaped timbers that also include carved motifs such as “daisy-wheels”, a cutting-edge design for its time with integrated housing for cows which allowed more cattle to be kept over the winter, increasing herd sizes and farming prosperity. To protect this investment, 18th century belief systems saw the use of witches’ marks or Listed Grade II*

St John the Baptist Church, boundary walls, vicarage and school, Pendeen, Cornwall, was provided by thecharismatic first vicar, Robert Aitken when the parish was created in 1846. The castellated boundary walls surrounding the churchyard and cemetery, described by John Betjeman as “like a toy fort”, are an astonishing piece of architecture in this remote setting in west Cornwall. Listed Grade II

 

Tidal Observatory, Newlyn, Cornwall, was completed in 1914 following the 1880s expansion of the Newlyn fishing industry, at the end of the new south pier at the request of the Ordnance Survey. Over the next 100 years, the observatory contributed key tidal data to studies in oceanography, geology and climate change, and while the Ordnance Survey gave up responsibility for the tidal observatory in 1983 it continues to be used for scientific tidal measurements. Listed Grade II

 

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