TAITMAIL  Abstracting the Greenberg

TAITMAIL Abstracting the Greenberg

In the unlikeliest of settings, the courtyard of a St James’s gentleman’s club, the most keenly argued issue of contemporary art of the last 70 years is being tackled full on: is abstract art really abstract?

Collins gets new No 2 role at Opera North

Collins gets new No 2 role at Opera North

David Collins, Opera North’s director of external affairs since 2016, has been promoted to the new role of executive director, answering to the CEO Richard Mantle.

Sarah Hopwood to step down as Glyndebourne’s MD

Sarah Hopwood to step down as Glyndebourne’s MD

After almost 25 years at Glyndebourne Sarah Hopwood is to retire next year as managing director.

‘Platinum’ festival gets a name and a shape for the future

‘Platinum’ festival gets a name and a shape for the future

The national arts festival for 2022, seen as a new version of the 1951 Festival of Britain and variously nicknamed Platinum, in recognition of next year being the 70th year of the Queen’s reign, and Brexit in accord with the Prime Minister’s alleged wishes, has an official name: UNBOXED: Creativity in the UK.

£150k award for civic arts

£150k award for civic arts

Invitations for applications were opened today for the second Award for Civic Arts Organisations, with £100,000 to the winner and £25,000 each to two runners up.

MY STORY	Blood and wonder of the gipsy opera

MY STORY Blood and wonder of the gipsy opera

Carlo Rizzi, artistic director, Opera Rara

Opera Rara, the company that rediscovers, restores, records and performs lost operatic masterpieces, is reviving Ruggero Leoncavallo’s second most popular opera (after Pagliacci), Zingari, with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra at the Cadogan Hall in December. It will be conducted by Carlo Rizzi, the former music director of Welsh National Opera and Opera Rara’s artistic director since 2019.

Oldest astronomy map on show for the first time

Oldest astronomy map on show for the first time

 The 3,600 year old Nebra Sky Disc, the world’s oldest map of the stars, is to go on display in Britain for the first time next year.

Royal Docks to be London’s £5bn new cultural quarter

Royal Docks to be London’s £5bn new cultural quarter

The mayors of London and Newham have declared the Royal Docks a new cultural quarter for the capital that could generate £5bn in investment over the next 20 years, as a new festival, Royal Docks Originals, opens.

Lost Tiepolo drawing turns up in Sitwells’ attic

Lost Tiepolo drawing turns up in Sitwells’ attic

An exquisite drawing by Tiepolo, one of the masters of Venice’s 18th century golden age, has been found in an attic, covered in bubble-wrap.

Anne Seymour Damer: the forgotten ‘female genius’

Anne Seymour Damer: the forgotten ‘female genius’

Horace Walpole described the sculptor Anne Seymour Damer as “a female genius”, yet her work is barely known now, almost 200 years after her death.

Rail boost for regional theatres

Rail boost for regional theatres

A railway company has teamed up with a group of regional theatres to boost their audiences following the Covid emergency.

Tiny Alnwick museum is UK's most friendly

Tiny Alnwick museum is UK's most friendly

The tiny Bailffgate Museum & Gallery in Alnwick, Northumberland, is the winner of this year’s Family Friendly Museum Award.

Cornwall and Durham longlisted for City of Culture 2025

Cornwall and Durham longlisted for City of Culture 2025

The government has announced the eight cities and conurbations that will vie to be City of Culture 2025, in succession to Coventry this year.

GOOD PRACTICE GUIDE    Borough culture power versus Covid

GOOD PRACTICE GUIDE Borough culture power versus Covid

In 2019 Waltham Forest was the first of mayor Sadiq Khan’s London Boroughs of Culture. Lorna Lee, assistant director of culture at Waltham Forest Council, shows how the structure built then helped its communities through the pandemic

Ex-director quits Science Museum board over sponsorship

Ex-director quits Science Museum board over sponsorship

Chris Rapley, the former director of the Science Museum, has resigned from its advisory board in the escalating row over its sponsorship by Shell.

£1m to give the world new British films

£1m to give the world new British films

The UK Global Screen Fund is to give £1m to help 18 new productions to get international showings.

MIMA offers first curating apprenticeship degrees

MIMA offers first curating apprenticeship degrees

In a ground-breaking move for careers in museums and galleries Middlesbrough’s MIMA School of Art and Design is offering the UK’s first combined masters and higher degree apprenticeship (HAD) in curating.

New £2m fund to help museums make ‘miracles on a shoestring’

New £2m fund to help museums make ‘miracles on a shoestring’

Art Fund today announces the first round of a new £2m grant stream, Reimagine, to enable museums, galleries and historic houses to connect with their communities better.

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM Image of the month

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM Image of the month

Into the Twilight Zone, 6.45pm, 25th September 2018, by Roger Jackson

Alan Sparrow with an image of St Paul’s and the City a sunset

Museum of Childhood’s £13m transformation – to Young V&A

Museum of Childhood’s £13m transformation – to Young V&A

Work has begun on the £13m transformation of the V&A’s Museum of Childhood in Bethnal Green, East London. It is due to reopen in 2023.

UK arts councils combine for international fund

UK arts councils combine for international fund

The four nations’ arts councils have collaborated on a new fund to encourage international partnerships on arts projects.

Double sculpture makes Shard London’s international meeting point

Double sculpture makes Shard London’s international meeting point

A new public sculpture by the Spanish artist Jaume Plensa that celebrates both internationalism and diversity has been unveiled at the point where the Shard, London’s tallest building, meets London Bridge Station.

Fund opens for ‘arts for social change’ projects

Fund opens for ‘arts for social change’ projects

Two charities have combined to cdevise a fund that supports arts collaborations for social change.

Courtauld reopens in November after £57m make-over

Courtauld reopens in November after £57m make-over

The Courtauld Gallery is to reopen in November after three years’ closure following its £57m modernisation, the most significant in its history.

Creative and cultural industries growth surge

New DCMS figures show 4.4% rise in culture to 2016

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Shock as Rutter steps down

Northern Broadsides founder cites ACE funding blow for decision

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Major drop in arts GCSEs, figures show

Ebacc fallout continues

Fewer pupils are taking arts subjects at GCSE, new figures reveal.

Data released by the Department for Education shows that entries to GCSE arts subjects fell by a further 46,000 last year, a drop of 9% drop over the past 12 months.  Entries in every arts subject area have fallen by at least 3,000 since last year, and three subjects – Drama; Media, Film and TV Studies; and Art and Design subjects – each decreased by over 6,000 entries.

This comes at the same time as entries to core English Baccalaureate (EBacc) subjects in continue to grow

Campiagners say that the decline in arts subjects popularity amongst 16 year olds shows that  EBacc is squeezing the arts out of schools.

“These new figures confirm that the EBacc is having a devastating effect on the uptake of creative subjects at GCSE and A Level,” a spokesperson for Bacc for the Future said.

“This evidence, on top of research published by the University of Sussex identifying the negative impact the EBacc is having on the provision of and uptake of music in schools, needs urgent attention from the Government.

“The Secretary of State must listen to the evidence and the teachers on the front line and scrap the EBacc in its current form before any more damage is done.”

The decline in take-up of arts at GCSE has also hit AS levels, with arts entries down by  43,000 since 2016. The fall was most pronounced in Art and Design Subjects, which fell by 21,000 entries (52%); Drama, which fell by 9,000 entries (65%); and Performing / Expressive Arts, which fell from 3,700 entries to 910 entries – a 75% drop.

 

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UK Music calls for planning change to protect venues

Dugher pushes for ‘agent of change’ rules to stop closures

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Black Country museum gets major boost

£9.8m to rebuild townscape from 1940s.

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Dance world mourns loss of degree in NI

Dance professionals have criticised a decision to drop Northern Ireland's only third-level moving arts degree.

Ulster University closed its BA Honours Dance course in Londonderry following an internal review. "In 2015, the Ulster University remained committed to teaching the course to existing students from 2015-2017 and one individual is currently employed on a temporary fixed-term contract basis to deliver on this commitment," a spokesman said. “There are currently two students in final year and five students undertaking modules in dance on a part-time basis.”

But Niall McCaughan, manager of Derry's Playhouse Theatre, told the Belfast Telegraph : "I'm incredibly disappointed that the dance degree at Magee has been cut completely. It's a sad indictment that here, in the former UK City of Culture, we've lost dance as a third level qualification.

"This particular dance degree fed into so many other creative spheres across Northern Ireland and it's such a shame that Northern Irish dancers will now be forced to study across the water or even further afield to achieve their goals."

Steve Batts, artistic director of dance theatre company Echo Echo, said, "It will make our long-term project of sustaining a committed, high quality, internationally connected and Derry-based ensemble much more difficult."

Award-winning Irish and contemporary dance teacher and choreographer Bridget Madden added: "It's a sad time for Northern Ireland's dance community."

ENDS

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£20 million Great Place Scheme kicks off

ACE/HLF announce pilot projects for cultural investment

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ACE faces Lottery cash drop

Arts Council England faces major drop in its income from the Lottery next year.

New figures from Lottery operator Camelot shows that Lottery ticket sales fell by £226m from April to September this year compared with the same period last year, and Camelot is warning of more falls to come.

Camelot CEO Andy Duncan said: “With the current climate of economic uncertainty and signs that consumers are being more cautious with their spending, we expect the next six months to be similarly challenging.”

Changes in the market, with more sales on scratchcards and digital games, which pay less to good causes, will also affect ACE’s income.

It’s part of a continuing downward trend in Lottery income for the good causes, which also includes sport, health and other charities. This year, 23.1% of income will go to good causes, compared with 24.6% last year and 28% in 2013. Of that Lottery cash, 20% went to the arts in 2015/16 – around £380m and 14% went to Arts Council England.

ACE outgoing chair Sir Peter Bazalgette said that the organisation would be keeping a close eye on its Lottery revenues, which were “increasingly important as our Grant in Aid has declined.”

But a spokesman for ACE said, “The National Lottery generates more money for good causes across the UK than any other institution and will continue to do so.  There have always been fluctuations in returns which we manage so that we can still support thousands of great projects across England.”

 

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Perdita Hunt to step down at Watts Gallery

Perdita Hunt is to leave the Watts Gallery near Guildford next summer after 12 years as director after restoring the gallery, acquiring the Watts’s home and saving the Watts Chapel.

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Helios Collective: Formations Masterclasses

Following the successes of Formations 2015 where three new operas were worked on over a two-week period by Kasper Holten (Director of Opera, Royal Opera House), Robert Saxton (composer), Stephen Unwin (Dean of BADA), Stephen Barlow (Artistic Director, Buxton Festival), Bettina Bartz (dramaturg) and David Parry (conductor), Helios Collective return with their Formations Masterclass series this November.  

 

The 2016 masterclasses feature the likes of Mark Wigglesworth, Janis Kelly, Judith Weir, David Pountney, James Clutton, Stephen Medcalf, Jonathan Moore and Brian Dickie. The Formations series allow participants to engage with the development of three new operas with the aid of leading industry professionals.

 

The Formations series will conclude with a final performance and feedback session at Lilian Baylis House on Friday 25th November.

 

Helios Collective Artistic Director, Ella Marchment comments, Formations Masterclasses grew out of my desire to create opera while, at the same time, generating opportunities for artists to gain access to practical development.  I wanted to create ways for these artists to access leading industry professionals and to form the educational environment that I longed for when I first pursued a directing career. Through Formations we are not only able to simultaneously further the education of artists, but also further the development of the operatic genre for a contemporary audience.  Opera is the ultimate art form in the way that it combines all other art forms and it is my personal mission to see this genre survive and thrive. 

 

The three pieces selected for this year’s masterclasses are:

 

Dead Equal: In 2016, a barrage of criticism met the introduction of British Servicewomen into army combat roles. But in 1916, one British woman was already there, embedded in the Allied frontline. Flora Sandes was a public heroine. This November, her successors go operational.  Through the stories of three women, real and imagined, Dead Equal celebrates the courage and sacrifice of women in theatres of war, probing the cost and meaning of service; the force of class in shaping opportunity, and the disruptive power of a female identity forged in blood and sweat.

 

FOR the LOVE of THORSTEIN SHIVERFOR the LOVE of THORSTEIN SHIVER is the Albran breakfast cereal of fecal epiphanies. It is loosely based on the medieval Iclandic þættir “The Tale of Thorstein Shiver”. The convulsing bowls of its libretto have also squeezed through other eupeptic survivors including Gilgamesh, Genesis, Joyce, Solomon, skaldic-verse, gnostic-prose, Whitman and those little bits of sweetcorn that always get there somehow. 

 

Yellow Wallpaper: The Yellow Wallpaper is a short, chamber opera based on the story of the same name by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935). The story is based on a nameless young woman’s descent into psychosis as her mental health issues are left misunderstood. The woman and her physician husband, John, move into a spacious and airy mansion, which he believes will help her health to improve by undergoing the rest cure; a common treatment developed in the late 1800s for the handling of hysteria and other nervous illnesses.  With nothing to stimulate her mind, the woman becomes growingly obsessed with the yellow, distressed wallpaper that covers the room and her imagination begins to run wild as she starts to believe it is moving and coming alive. As her fascination with the wallpaper spirals out of control, so does her quest to break free.

 

This project is supported by Arts Council England, the International Opera Awards, English National Opera, the Hinrischen Foundation and The Fenton Trust. 

 

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Museums need more diverse workforce

UK museums need to change their recruitment practices to attract a more diverse workforce, says a new report commissioned by the MuseumsAassociation and Arts Council England.


The report, Character Matters: Attitudes, Behaviours and Skills in the UK Museum Workforce also says that there is a shortage of people who can combine a museum specialism with business, leadership and digital skills. 


Researchers found that the majority of the museum workforce is made up of white women, although on average men in the sector earn more and occupy more senior positions. It also found that 88% of respondents hold a degree of some sort; and that just 30% of museum job adverts state that they would consider equivalent experience rather than a formal qualification. 


The report suggests that museums should pilot non-traditional recruitment methods for some short-term posts and to put a higher priority on personal qualities such as conscientiousness and optimism rather than formal qualifications. These qualities are assets in a work environment that will require adaptability, entrepreneurialism and fewer deep specialisms.  It adds that the museums sector faces a challenge to be more flexible, agile and entrepreneurial and supportive of their workforce?”


Sharon Heal, the MA’s director, says: “We believe that the sector needs to foster values such as equality, diversity and inclusion in order to best respond to the changing environment in which we operate and that these values are at the heart of our new professional development programmes.”


“It should be a clarion call to all of us,” says John Orna-Ornstein, ACE’s director of museums. “The strongest asset of museums is their workforce and they deserve proper support and development.”


The report was also supported by Museums Galleries Scotland and the Association of Independent Museums, and produced by BOP Consulting with the Museum Consultancy.

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SIMON TAIT'S DIARY

 

The bank’s own Sexton Blakes

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SOLT launches major research study

Top theatre bodies have commissioned a major research project into training needs of the theatre and performing arts sector.

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Senior Corporate Account Manager

National 

 

Hours: 35

Contract Type: Permanent - Full Time

Department: Other

Pay Range: £35,000 - £40,000 per annum DOE

Closing Date: 12pm, Monday 13 June 2016

The Development Department is the fundraising function of the National. Its aim is to raise voluntary funds for the theatre from individuals, corporations and charitable trusts and foundations.

The Department consists of thirty three staff split across the three main sectors outlined above, with a dedicated Events team. There are recognised overlaps between the three sectors which call for the Department to work closely as an integrated team. The Department also works with a Development Council of senior external fundraising volunteers, chaired by Elizabeth Offord.

We are seeking a Senior Corporate Account Manager to deliver, extend, renew and evolve existing complex, high-level, long-term corporate partnerships, supporting the team in delivering best in class account management.

Appointment Procedure

Please note that applications can only be considered if they are submitted through the National’s Online Recruitment System, and returned by the closing date.

The closing date for the receipt of completed application forms is: Monday 13 June 2016 at 12pm.

The anticipated date of first interviews is: Week Commencing 20 June 2016.

For any queries, please contact the HR Department by emailing: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The National Theatre is committed to being an equal opportunities employer

 

 

 

To apply for this vacancy please follow the link:https://apply.nationaltheatre.org.uk/45309RNT

Please contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you have any queries.

The National Theatre is committed to being an Equal Opportunities Employer

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Festivals: Home in a golden Dome

 

The 50th Brighton Festival opened last weekend with a theme of ‘home and place’, secure in its own domus beside the Royal Pavilion

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Cardiff’s shout

 

The arts festival season is here with the Brighton programme the traditional curtain-raiser for the 50 or so top line events this summer which the Edinburgh and Manchester editions dominate. But there is a new one next month to join them, in a place that has been an unproclaimed capital of culture since long before it became a national capital 60 years ago.

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