Simon Wales to take over at Bristol Beacon

Simon Wales to take over at Bristol Beacon

Louise Mitchell’s successor as CEO of Bristol Beacon is to be Simon Wales, currently head of the Stowe House Preservation Trust.

TAITMAIL   A tide of creativity

TAITMAIL A tide of creativity

Art has never been subject to boundaries, and when politicians and educationalists define science and art as separate disciplines they’re missing the point. As anyone with a scintilla of imagination knows, art is nature, nature is science, science is art.

Public wants public funding for museums – report

Public wants public funding for museums – report

In the face of swingeing cuts to the resources of local, regional and national museums, a new survey shows that the public wants our museums to be supported by public funding.

BM starts search for remake masterminds

BM starts search for remake masterminds

The British Museum has launched an international competition to find architects to redesign its western range of galleries, currently housing the Elgin Marbles, as part of its long-term £1bn restoration and recasting programme.

ACE pledges £24m more for capital investment

ACE pledges £24m more for capital investment

Arts Council England is giving £24.2m to improve cultural infrastructure in 67 organisations, it has announced today.

Seabright takes over at Horniman

Seabright takes over at Horniman

Gordon Seabright, head if the Creative Land Trust, is to be the next chief executive of the Horniman Museum in South London. He will succeed Nick Merriman, who has become CEO of English Heritage, in July.

Name change for Royal Opera House

Name change for Royal Opera House

The Royal Opera House in Covent Garden is changing its name to the Royal Ballet and Opera House so that the theatre’s full range of activity is clear for potential audiences.

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM   Image of the Month

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM Image of the Month

Basque refugees at Southampton by Frank Rust, 23 May 1937, Daily Mail

TAITMAIL Museums of serious fun

TAITMAIL Museums of serious fun

Art Fund has announced the shortlisted museums for the 2024 Museum of the Year award, the winner getting £120,000 and the runners-up £15,000 each. For four of the five it will be won by an institution unrecognisable as a museum by their founding fathers.

‘Peoples’ museums’ in line for £120k Art Fund prize

‘Peoples’ museums’ in line for £120k Art Fund prize

Museums that have moulded their new approach around visitors rather than collections are competing for the Art Fund Museum of the Year award.

Cartmell heads for Royal Exchange

Cartmell heads for Royal Exchange

Selina Cartmell is to be the first creative director of the Royal Exchange, Manchester, taking up the post in August.

Keegan cuts university arts funding in favour of STEM

Keegan cuts university arts funding in favour of STEM

Education secretary Gillian Keegan is cutting funding for university performing arts and creative courses in favour of  science and technology studies.

Foley to leave Birmingham Rep

Foley to leave Birmingham Rep

Sean Foley is stepping down as artistic director of Birmingham Rep, a decision he says is unconnected with Birmingham Council’s recent 100% budget cut to the company, which he said created a difficult outlook”.

Cardiff national museum may close after Gething refuses help

Cardiff national museum may close after Gething refuses help

National Museums Wales’ Cardiff flagship may have to close and 90 jobs will be axed after the Welsh government refused to step in to help.

£14.8m for industrial heritage skill building

£14.8m for industrial heritage skill building

Seven industrial heritage projects across the UK that focus on training for traditional skills are to benefit from a £14.8m grant package from the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

TAITMAIL Despite the odds, orchestras are hooking new concert-goers

TAITMAIL Despite the odds, orchestras are hooking new concert-goers

This weekend, for two nights, the enormous 40,000 seat La Defense arena - which doubles as a concert venue and a rugby stadium - will be filled with excited youngsters eager to hear, not a pop star or a rock group, but the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM   Image of the Month

THE ART OF PHOTOJOURNALISM Image of the Month

Sylvester Mittee’s hands by Eamonn McCabe, 1981, The Observer

Cullinan to be next BM director

Cullinan to be next BM director

Nicholas Cullinan, currently director of the National Portrait Gallery, is to head the British Museum in possibly its most troubled period in its 256-year history. The appointment was approved by 10 Downing Street today.

English Heritage opens to food bank customers

English Heritage opens to food bank customers

Users of food banks will be able to visit English Heritage properties free over the Easter break.

£33m levelling up money for museums and libraries

£33m levelling up money for museums and libraries

Nearly 70 museums and libraries in England are to benefit from the latest round of funding from the government’s Cultural Investment Fund (CIF).

TAITMAIL    Chatsworth: The future for stately homes that can no longer be merely visitor attractions

TAITMAIL Chatsworth: The future for stately homes that can no longer be merely visitor attractions

For as long as anyone can remember, Chatsworth House’s logo has been the imposing Palladian façade, a forbidding aspect. Not anymore. 

South Ken back on the street…

South Ken back on the street…

South Kensington’s arts and science institutions are combining to stage the fifth Great Exhibition Street Festival this summer.

Creative exports still rising despite Brexit

Creative exports still rising despite Brexit

The UK’s creative industries' service exports have continued to rise despite Covid and Brexit, according to a new report from the Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre (Creative PEC) published today.

Campbell leaves Theatre Wales after grant slashed

Campbell leaves Theatre Wales after grant slashed

Lorne Campbell is standing down as artistic director and CEO of National Theatre Wales in the middle of a restructure that follows the 100% cut in its Arts Council Wales grant.

An apolitical manifesto

The trouble with general elections is politics. They get in the way of proper policy-making, and the politicians draw up manifestos full of the kind of promises they think will appeal to the electorate – fewer foreigners jumping the NHS queues, more power for the unions, fair tax for everyone, no tax rises for anyone - while the really important stuff is left in the in-tray. Really important stuff vital in a unique way to the British economy like the arts and allied endeavours. Top of the news lists post-election will be the winners tying themselves in knots as they try to get out of those promises.


 
Nevertheless, John Kampfner and his Creative Industries Federation have got a “creative industries manifesto” out before even the main parties have, and it’s not hard to see how: it’s virtually the blueprint submission to business secretary Greg Clark’s industrial strategy submitted a few days before the election was a called, but none the worse for that. Kampfner says the creatives industries should be a priority in the election; it won’t be, but that doesn’t mean it’s not worth making the point about why it should be at every opportunity because there is another audience.
 
In a non-election situation Clark happily accepts that the creative industries have become a vital element for our future prosperity, and since this is a Brexit election Kampfner wants to make sure that the promise and the perils awaiting the arts in leaving Europe are understood and acted upon.
 
He’s made it easy for those with no time to absorb exhaustive briefs by making ten succinct points: first, the cultural industries are worth £90 billion a year, so make sure they are high on the Brexit negotiating agenda; prioritise them in a new visa system to make sure artists can still travel freely (we need foreign creatives because our education system precludes making our own); double the number of creative organisations exporting by the end of the next Parliament; introduce creative enterprise zones with special rent rates for artists and small enterprises – bizarrely, despite the enormous economic value of the creative industries those who work in them are notoriously poorly paid; make a business booster sector to encourage investment in new start enterprises; set up a creative skills commission; launch a creative careers campaign; limit the designation “outstanding” to the schools that deserve it by virtue of their creative skills teaching; make national and local arts subsidy inflation proof; maintain and increase the growth of the creative industries.
 
Not much to frighten the horses, though index-linked subsidy – sorry, “investment” – might cause some mild indigestion, but it's a manifesto that isn’t launched at the British electorate so much as the eurocracy that will be ranged on either side of the table shortly after June 8th. Calling this election is an act of political expediency, so let’s make the point about the importance of the creative industries now and then forget about it for a few weeks until this other nonsense is over, and then push as hard as possible. The creative industries won’t be a priority up to the general election, but let’s make sure they are as soon as the polls close.
 

 

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